HMS ParentCamp

Join us for ParentCamp!

Hutchinson Middle School’s Auditorium

September 23rd, 2019 at 6:00-7:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m. Door prize drawing! (Must be present to win)

ParentCamp is an opportunity for parents and school staff to come together for face-to-face discussion about whats best for kids. Every adult within the session brings an important and unique perspective to contribute to sharing strategies and ideas to benefit students learning, teaching, and parenting.

Topics for ParentCamp include:

  • Academic Support
  • Activities at the Middle School
  • Technology & Cyber Safety
  • TigerPath at the Middle School
  • Second Step (Social-Emotional Curriculum)
  • Bullying
  • Vaping

 

ParentCamp is open to Hutchinson Public School parents. We hope you will join us for this exciting event!

Tutors

Tutors:  The District does not endorse or recommend specific tutors; however, a list of people providing tutoring services is available.

Click Here

 

HMS Orientation & Back to School Information 2019-2020 School Year

Hutchinson Middle School Back to School 2019-20 Information

We are looking forward to the incoming 6th graders and all new students joining our Middle family for the upcoming 2019-20 school year.  Also all returning students lets make 2019-2020 awesome! 

Hutchinson Middle School Back to School 2019-20 Information (printable version)

New 7th & 8th Grade Orientation Session: Tuesday, August 13th 2019

There will be 1 session on Tuesday from 9 to 11 a.m.  Please watch your mail toward the end of July for a letter inviting you to the session.

6th Grade Orientation Sessions: Wednesday August 14th 2019 and Thursday, August 15th 2019

There will be 4 total sessions during the two days (1 AM and 1 PM per day). AM Session will be 8 to 11 a.m. and 12 to 3 p.m. for PM session.   Please watch your mail toward the end of July for a letter inviting you to a  6th Grade Orientation Session (your student will only need to attend 1 of the 4 sessions).

Parent Informational Meetings

Will be held on Thursday, August 15th and Tuesday, August 20th in the Middle School Auditorium.  The exact evening time is 6:00 p.m. “First-time” Middle School parents are encouraged to attend one of these sessions, as they will cover our Middle School policies; student expectations, general information and any questions parents may have.

Link Crew  2019-2020 Meeting

Link Team 2019-2020 members will receive a letter in the mail late July.  Link Crew orientation and training will be held Monday, August 12th from 9 to 11 a.m.

Middle School Open House

Will be on Wednesday, August 28th from 3:00-7:00 p.m.  During this time, the teaching staff will be available for you to meet with, you can walk throughout the building, and the office will be open for any questions.

 

Please if you need anymore information or have any questions, please call the Hutchinson Middle School office at 320-587-2854.

Parent Involvement & the Middle School Years

The Importance of Parent Involvement During the Middle School Years
By Todd Grina, Middle School Principal

Many parents who are actively involved in the education of their children at the elementary school level typically become less involved when their children reach middle school. However, parent involvement in a child’s education during the middle school years is just as important in a child’s success at school as it is in earlier grades. During a child’s adolescent years, they experience the second largest growth period in their lives. As children grow, they begin to experience physical, intellectual, emotional and social changes. These are confusing times for the adolescent learner. These changes, along with the added demands of increased academic rigor and expectations of school, activities and peer pressure, create conflicts and tension in the adolescent, which can lead to increased mental health issues and conflict in school and at home.

The participation of all parents is important to the academic achievement and mental well-being of their children. Such participation has many positive consequences for the family, the school, and especially for the young adolescent: the family better understands school expectations and operations. The student receives support from adults, at home and at school, in order to confront and to help them navigate the issues of the ever evolving adolescent. Adult support is particularly important where these problems are accentuated by the conflicting cultures of home, friends, and school. The school can become the natural extension of the home, aiding in the preservation of families’ cultures, morals and values. When parents become involved and team with the school, both students and school benefit. We see higher academic achievement, students’ attitudes and behaviors are more positive, less mental health issues, academic programs are more successful; and the schools, as a whole, are more effective.

There are many ways that parents can demonstrate to their adolescent children that they are interested in academic success and that they are available to offer support and protection when there are problems. Here are some suggestions:

  • Talk with your child about daily happenings at school. Both academically and socially.
  • Find ways to spend some stress free time with your child. Share a meal or a snack. Make sure they know the positive attributes you like about them.
  • Listen to and share their concerns. Support what you believe to be good about the school and offer your help to change practices that you believe could enhance your child’s educational experience.
  • Avoid scoldings and arguments when your teenagers bring bad news home. It’s better to be a listener and suggest ways to improve the situation.
  • Show that you value education by encouraging homework completion and reading. Establishing a consistent time and place for them to do their homework that is void of distraction
  • Establish a positive relationship with teachers early in the year. This makes it easier to have constructive conversations in times of difficulty.
  • Avoid comparing sibling experiences as each child’s experience is unique to them.
  • Get to know the guidance counselors. They can keep you informed regarding the progress and behavior of your child as well as a good resource for added supports you may need.
  • Read the student/parent handbook carefully and stay updated with the day to day happenings at the school through the daily announcements and Campus Messenger.
  • Keep informed about your child’s grades and test results, especially in any subjects in which he or she struggles, though the parent portal.

The results of recent research are very clear: when parents are actively involved in their children’s education, they do better in school. It is essential for parents to have a positive attitude regarding education, and to demonstrate trust that their children can do well.

Technology Innovation Specialist – Jocelynn Buckentin

Smartphones: Making a Case for Waiting Until 8th

Kids these days. This phrase has been uttered by each generation as they progress into adulthood and reflect back on their own childhood. When I think of my own, I remember playing outside until the streetlights came on in the summer. My neighborhood friends and I were kept busy building forts, climbing trees, and exploring the world around us. Children are growing up in a different world than the one experienced by past generations. Technology use is now a given rather than a luxury. Smartphones have become constant companions.

The full impact of being constantly connected has yet to be ascertained, but there are several distressing effects that have come to light in recent years, including the negative impact on the mental health of our children. Early social media use is a contributing factor, as it allows kids to dwell on what their friends are doing without them.

One common pressure faced by families at increasingly younger ages is the question of when to get your child their first cell phone. The day before I left for college, I purchased my first cell phone because I wanted an easy way to keep track of  friends and family. Today, students as young as elementary school begin making this request of their parents. You might hear about how everyone already has one, and how your child doesn’t want to be the only one who doesn’t. The word unfair might be thrown in for good measure.

According to a recent survey given to parents of students in grades 5-12 in Hutchinson Public Schools, 81.7% of parents believe that students should receive their first smartphone between grades 6-9. Just over 31% of parents feel that it is appropriate to introduce smartphones in Grade 6, and 50% of parents wait until their student is in grades 7-9 before purchasing their child a smartphone.

The decision on when to give your child a smartphone is a deeply personal one based on many factors, but typically revolving around the need to be connected. Kids today are busy, and parents need a method for knowing both where their children are and when they might need a ride. This issue alone tips the scales in favor of a cell phone purchase for many families.

There has been a push in recent months for parents around the country to sign a pledge to “Wait Until 8th.” This grassroots movement encourages parents to band together in support of letting kids be kids by delaying the purchase of a smartphone until Grade 8. They argue that smartphone use in childhood is altering the typical childhood experience because kids are choosing to be on devices instead of hanging out with friends, playing outside, or reading.

No matter what each family decides, it is important to weigh all options and avoid the early purchase of a smartphone due to the convenience of adding a child to the family plan. It’s more work to find a flip phone than it is to take advantage of a free smartphone offer, which may be what’s best for the wireless provider but not the child. To sign the pledge and learn more about the potential negative effects of smartphone use in children, visit www.waituntil8th.org.

 

It Is About You!

At Parks, Recreation and Community Education, It Is About You

By Dolf Moon, Director of Parks, Recreation & Community Education

Even with cool temperatures, summer is right around the corner. The PRCE brochure is out and has plenty of opportunities for you and your family. We look forward to seeing your family at the Hutchinson Aquatic Center this summer. Your kids may be interested in the four free Passport to the Parks opportunities included in our brochure. We also have a variety of sports camp offerings led by the Tiger Coaching Staff.

This summer you will want to take advantage of our many community playgrounds. We encourage you check out our parks, trails and fitness park information at www.ci.hutchinson.mn.us or maybe even try geocaching. Perhaps consider registering for our new Youth Camps located at Rotary Park.

The PRCE Department offers a wide variety of educational and recreational opportunities to district residents. The uniqueness of the program starts with you. If you have an interest and do not see a program that meets your needs, let us know. We will try to arrange a program. If you have a skill, you would like to share with others, give us a call. We are currently putting together the fall/winter brochure

PRCE reaches out to the entire community whether you are a parent with a preschool child (Early Childhood Family Education), a student taking a program after school, participating in Middle School athletics, an adult in a class or league, a senior citizen dropping by our center there’s something for all ages. PRCE also provides Adult Basic Education opportunities. Whether you dropped out of high school, are looking for a new job or trying to receive your GED, we can help. If you are looking to use a facility, a park shelter or a ball field, we can help.

Parks, Recreation and Community Education understand that “community” extends from neighborhoods to the world. We are flexible enough to meet the needs of a fast-changing society. We can extend the reach of education and bring people together in a common purpose. We like getting people involved in our schools. We can become partners in addressing community needs. We do this by offering a scope of activities and services that evolve with new generations of people and technologies, making the community a learning center open for people of all ages.

Parks, Recreation and Community Education reaches out to be inclusive. Every day it proves that the community and our schools, working together, can be greater than the sum of their individual parts.

Tour HHS – 4/25/19

Tour Hutchinson High School April 25, 2019

The Hutchinson High School will be open to the community for self-guided tours on Thursday, April 25, 2019 from 5:00 to 7:30 pm. Members of the Board of Education, high school students and staff will be available to visit and answer questions.

 

Click Here to View the Hutchinson High School Video Tour

Courtesy of HCVN, Hutchinson Community Video Network

Click Here to Access the Work Zone Camera

2019-2020 Academic School Calendar

The 2019-2020 Academic School Calendar was approved by the Board of Education on April 8, 2019.

Click Here for the 2019-2020 Academic School Calendar

 

 

 

Help Your Children Branch Out

By Dan Olberg, Park Elementary Principal

One of the beliefs we have at Park Elementary is that everyone is a scientist. We are trying to break the stereotypical image that our students have regarding scientists. Scientists are not just those who dress up in a white lab coats and wear safety glasses all day. Scientists are farmers, cooks, hairdressers, construction workers, and much more. So when a student brought up the fact that moms and dads are scientists, I started to think about how true that statement is – especially as we know more about the brain and how it functions early in life.

Scientifically speaking, if there was one part of the brain that is more important to the intelligence of a child it would have to be the cerebral cortex. That’s where higher cognitive processing occurs. As children learn new things they are essentially changing those neurons, or nerve cells, their structure, and the chemistry in their cerebral cortices.

Human beings get an explosive growth of dendrites in the cerebral cortex, like branches, in their first 8 to 10 years of life. These branches link knowledge and experiences together. Think of it as a tree with branches and leaves. The leaves hold pieces of information and the branches link the information together. As long as new experiences and knowledge continues to filter in, the branches grow and sprout new leaves. Naturally, there is a rapid growth of branches in these early years and it peaks at about the age of 10 when it slowly starts to decrease. At this point the branches that haven’t made connections die off. This process is called pruning. That’s why there’s so much interest today in those first 10 years of life.

So we need to ask ourselves as scientists some very important questions. How can we give children the best experiences for maximum growth? What activities are our children doing that foster brain growth? What activities are our children doing to stifle or limit the growth? What are we doing as parents to engage our children in life experiences? Those questions are not hard to answer; however, acting on them can be more than difficult at times.

So the students had it right, parenting is part science. Our guidance through these important years is scientifically important. The most exciting discovery about all this research is that education should continue for a lifetime. The brain’s capacity for learning and change is limitless, depending on our willingness to seek new experiences and opportunities. Our “trees,” as well as our children’s can continue to fill out and expand with a wide variety of real-world and academic activities. “Branch out” and support children’s continued brain growth.

Online Videos – What Parents Need to Know

You may have heard about issues surrounding YouTube and challenges targeting young children. We wanted to take a moment to share some important child safety information with you through the image linked below. While the “Momo Challenge” has been unverifiable, it is important to be aware of what children are watching through video apps, and nothing is ever guaranteed to be safe. If you have any concerns regarding internet safety for your children, contact the District’s Technology Innovation Specialist Jocelynn Buckentin at 320-234-2716 or jocelynn.buckentin@isd423.org.

What Parents Need to Know about Online Videos

 

 

 

 

Hutchinson Public Schools

Hutchinson Public Schools