Tigers of the Week: Ainslea Jensen & Hayden Jensen

Congratulations to Ainslea and Hayden, our TIGERs of the Week.

Ainslea Jensen – Girls Hockey

Ainslea works hard at every practice and in every game, no matter the score. She is a versatile player and can play defense, wing and center. Regardless of the position she is playing does her best to help the team be successful. She is a gritty player who is willing to do the tough little things that don’t always show up on the score sheet but make a big difference in the outcome of the game.

Hayden Jensen – Boys Hockey

Hayden has been one of our most consistent players throughout the course of the season. Saturday he completed the game with 5 points (1 goal and 4 assists). Hayden is a great teammate that works very hard to make those around him better. His work ethic is contagious. He is a great teammate that leads through his examples both on and off the ice.

Who Do You Think You Are?

By Dave Ellefson, High School Counselor

Adolescence is a time in a person’s life where he/she goes through many changes. Both emotionally and physically.  It is a time to discover strengths and weaknesses. It is a time to learn about the effort and grit it takes to find success in our areas of weakness and to overcome setbacks as we follow our compass into the future. Career Theorist Eli Ginzberg states that there are three stages of career development.

The first stage is known as the Fantasy Period. This period ends at about age 11. During this time in a child’s life, careers are usually based on play. Ginzberg believed children transition from playful imitation to work imitation near the end of this stage.

In middle and high school years, adolescent children are able to better focus on, and recognize, work requirements and move into the Transition Stage. There are four components in this period. The first component is “interest,” where children learn likes and dislikes. The second component is “capacity,” where the child learns how much his/her abilities align with his/her interests. The third component, “values,” sees the child at 15 become aware of how work may fulfill his/her values. The final component of this period is called “transition.” Transition begins when the individual assumes responsibility for his/her own actions, becomes independent and exercises her freedom of choice.

The final stage of career develop will also begin during a student’s time in high school. The realistic period begins at age 17 and goes into the early 20s. The first phase of the realistic stage is “exploration.” During this phase, the student chooses a career path but remains open to other opportunities. The next phase, “crystallization,” is when the student  becomes more engrossed in a particular career, committing to one direction more than ever. The third period is “specification,” in which the student commits to or develops a preference for a specific area of work.

You may be asking, “Why is this important?” It is important because students need help with this process. Over the past few years, we have been very intentional at the high school level about helping to guide our students through this process with the creation of Tigerpath Academies, 4 year plan development, and Advisory lessons which guide students through the career development process. High School class registration will be beginning in the new year and we need the whole Hutchinson community to be equipped to help our youth as they make decisions about their future and explore interests and abilities. Hutchinson, our region, and our state are all affected by how well we do this. In the state of MN, only 60% of students who attend a 4 year college have graduated within 6 years of enrollment. In community colleges, only 29% who are enrolled compete a degree in 3 years. April Hanson, a representative of ACT, says one of the main reasons qualified students do not compete a degree is due to the fact that they do not have a clear career path in place. Hutchinson High School is committed to helping our students to be on the positive side of these statistics.

Stephen Smith and Shaun Fanning have written a book titled Who Do You Think You Are? It is an excellent resource for those who influence teens including parents, educators, employers, youth leaders, etc. Its intent is to give suggestions on how to coach teens to achieve college and career success by helping them to discover strengths and interests. It also gives suggestions to help teens decide on the correct path to reach career success. This may include college, the military, an apprenticeship, or work experience to reach personal goals. We have 20 copies of this book available for check out at the high school media center. Join us in helping our students to direct their individual career paths by asking them the following questions:  Who are you?, Where are you heading?, and How will you get to where you want to go?.

Activities: January 14-19, 2019

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

School Board Meetings: January 14, 2019

The ISD 423 Board of Education will conduct a reorganization meeting on Monday, January 14, 2019 beginning at 5:30 pm and a regular meeting on Monday, January 14, 2019 following the reorganization meeting in the Council Chambers at the Hutchinson City Center (111 Hassan St SE).

Click Here for School Board Agendas

Hutch Tigers Young Athletes

Tiger of the Week: Conner Hogan

Congratulations to Conner, our TIGER of the Week:

Conner Hogan – Boys Swim and Dive

Conner finished first in the 100 Backstroke at the Hutch Invite and 100 Freestyle in the Delano/Watertown dual meet. As a 7th grader it is very difficult to compete with junior and seniors, let alone win races against them. That is exactly what Conner has done to start the season. Conner has given great effort in practices and meets so far this season. He shows the utmost respect for his coaches, teammates and opponents. Conner is showing tremendous promise and should have a great season.

Activities: January 7 – 12, 2019

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

Activities: December 31 – January 5

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

Empathy + Compassion = Kindness

By Jill Bridge, Licensed School Counselor

It is the season of hope, love and joy for many as they celebrate the holidays, such as Christmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanzaa. As people enter the holiday season they are embracing empathy, compassion, and kindness. Regardless of how large or small a gesture of kindness is, each gesture is a way to teach our kids, families and community about empathy and compassion. We shouldn’t need an award or recognition each and every time we show kindness. Knowing that you did something good and kind should be an intrinsic motivator to repeat it again and again. The goal should not be fame and fortune but about knowing that the kind act was meaningful and impacted another person’s life in a positive way.

Empathy is feeling or understanding what someone else is feeling. It is important for kids and adults to realize that two people may have very different feelings about the same situation. Understanding this concept will help us put ourselves in others’ shoes; we take the time and energy to look at life from their perspective. Their viewpoint may not be the same as yours but it is important to realize that is ok. For example, I can like you, I can respect you, but I don’t have to have the same feelings and thoughts as you. We are all different, and as such, we need to respect those differences.

Once the person has the ability to understand another’s perspective, the person can start to develop empathy for others, which can evolve into compassion. When you have empathy for others, you can say or do many things to show care and concern. Saying something kind or doing something helpful for others are examples of showing compassion. Imagine what our community would be like if we took that extra moment to think about another’s feelings and did something to show compassion. As a family, talk about ways you and your children can show compassion for others. During the holidays, there are a variety of opportunities to show compassion-some that cost money while others don’t cost a dime. For example, you can contact the animal shelter and help take care of the animals, you can donate to the Salvation Army red kettles, shovel a neighbor’s driveway, leave a note and/or word of encouragement for a coworker, or any idea your family holds dear.

Kindness is an overall theme that emerges when we model empathy and compassion, with kindness being the end result. Kindness is the quality of being friendly, generous, and considerate. How do we decide when we are being compassionate or spreading kindness? Can they be the same thing but labeled differently? They definitely can be.  The list of ways to show compassion above are ways to show kindness. When you are being compassionate you are also being kind. In order to know the best ways to be compassionate and kind we need to walk in the other person’s shoes, and use empathy.

Empathy, kindness and compassion are skills that are taught. They are not innate traits, they are learned through discussions and by seeing/hearing examples. Be a role model that helps others understand empathy, compassion and kindness. We are role models for children, family members and even strangers. Embrace the holidays, spread kindness and cheer through using empathy and compassion. Kindness goes a long way not just during the holidays but each and every day of the year.

Activities: December 24 – 29, 2018

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

Hutchinson Public Schools

Hutchinson Public Schools