Archives for November 2018

Tigers of the Week: Sabrina Tracy & Lane Glaser

Congratulations to Sabrina and Lane, our TIGERs of the Week.

Sabrina Tracy – Girls Hockey

Sabrina works hard every single day, she competes as hard in practice as she does in a games. She is always willing to work on something new that will help her and/or benefit the team as a whole. Sabrina has a positive attitude and shows respect to her team, coaches, opponents and officials.

Lane Glaser – Boys Hockey

Lane is been one of our top players for the past 2 seasons and has really developed into one of the top players in the conference. He got off to a good start scoring the first goal of the season.  Lane is also proving to be a great leader for us early on this year. He has been extremely helpful with many of our young players. He also demonstrates leadership with the younger players in the youth program. His effort is contagious which is important when promoting the team concept.

Teddy Bear Toss

Hutchinson Girls’ Hockey 2nd Annual
Teddy Bear Toss

When: Thursday, November 29th

Varsity Game: 7:00pm

Why: Cheer on the Hutchinson Girls as they play LDC!

What: Bring a teddy bear/stuffed animal and/or Kleenex, Toilet Paper, Paper Towels, Trash Bags, Wet Wipes

Who: HOMES (Housing Options in McLeod for Emergency Shelter)

After Hutchinson scores their first goal of the game, there will be A Teddy Bear Toss!

Everyone will throw their teddy bears onto the ice!

**All other items will be collected near the entrance of the rink**

Whalen Gymnasium Dedication

Screen Time and Development

Your Time is Limited: Look Around You

By Antonia Barrick, RN, BSN, PHN, LSN
Hutchinson Public Schools Health Services Coordinator

Digital media and screens have become a staple in our lives. We live in an era that we have everything at our fingertips and are forgetting how to promote interpersonal relationships and communication. Our phones are connected to our schedules, bank accounts, the internet and cameras. However, do we understand the impact screen time and digital media are having on our children’s development? Children are consuming 7+ hours of screen time per day, which is an increase of 2.5 hours in 10 years.

Ongoing research is showing guidelines for limiting screen time for younger children: no screen/digital media for children under 2 years of age, no more than 1 hour for children 2-5 years of age and less than 2 hours for children 6-18 years of age. In spite of these guidelines studies are showing children are spending on average 2 hours per day between 3 and 5 years of age and on average up to 7 hours on children over 8 years of age.

The brain is continually developing, especially in early childhood when development of emotional regulation and attachment, language, cognitive, socio-emotional and motor skills happen as well as physical development (ages birth to 8). “Middle childhood (usually defined as ages 6 to 12) is a time when children develop foundational skills for building healthy social relationships and learn roles that will prepare them for adolescence and adulthood.” This can be slowed by over use of screens and digital media. Studies show shrinkage or loss (atrophy) of gray matter especially in the frontal lobe, striatum and insula of the brain in comparison to internet/gaming addictions. The frontal lobe continues to develop and undergo massive changes from puberty to mid-twenties and is responsible for executive functioning (planning, prioritizing, and organizing) as well as impulse control. The striatum aids in reward pathways and the ability to decrease unacceptable social impulses. Lastly, the insula is an area that helps with empathy and ability to identify body signals of different emotions. The brain also develops responses to preferred activities that releases dopamine (reward/pleasure chemical). When a person is addicted or enjoys screen time the brain releases dopamine to tell the person this makes me happy, hence the addiction and anxiety to always checking the phone, tablet, TV, computer.

If children are exposed to screen time/digital media at a younger age or for excessive times the brain develops an addiction and can inhibit individuals’ ability to process face-to-face interactions. Children strive for attention and if a parent is on their phone/device the child will most likely act out to gain that attention, which some individuals may look at that as a behavior or reward the behavior with the tablet, TV, or device, thus continuing the vicious circle. The developmental periods for children who rely on digital interaction rather than face-to-face interactions or reduced caregiving from parents who are also attached to their devices can hinder school success, health literacy, self-discipline, the ability to make good decisions, healthy eating habits and conflict negotiation. The reliance on screen time can also decrease creative imagination and play time and in turn increase boredom.

So what can we do?

10 questions to Consider:

  1. What kind of screens are in your home (i.e. TV, tablet, computer, smartphone)? Which does your child use? Which do you use?
  2. Is watching TV or programs/movies on other devices a shared family activity and a common way to relax? How often is a screen on in the background although no one is really watching?
  3. Does anyone in the family use screens during meal times?
  4. What do you watch with your child and what does your child watch alone?
  5. Do you encourage or discourage conversation with your child while using screens?
  6. Do you ever watch adult content with your child around?
  7. Does your child use screens while you do chores around the home?
  8. Are there any screen-based activities in your child’s day care program? Do you know how much these are used?
  9. Does your child use any kind of screen before bedtime? How long before bed? Is there a screen in their room or charged in their room?
  10. Does your family have rules/guidelines for screen use that everyone understands and follows such as “device free times”?

 

Information obtained from:

Healthy People 2020
https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/early-and-middle-childhood
NPR.org Kids and Screen Time: What does the Research Say?
TruceTeachers.org
Mayo Clinic
Canadian Paediatric Society
And Psychology Today
Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood

Activities: November 26 – December 1, 2018

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

Tiger of the Week: Jordan Ludowese

Congrats to Jordan, our TIGER of the Week for November 19 – 23

Jordan Ludowese – Student Activities

Jordan has been leading Earth Club and has been a driving force in efforts to enact change at HHS. She has led a group of students in reaching out to school administrators and community members in efforts to make HHS more sustainable.

Activities: November 19-24, 2018

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

American Education Week, November 12-16, 2018

From NEA President Lily Eskelesen Garcia . . .

American Education Week is November 12-16, and it’s a great reminder that educators across the nation are dedicated to nurturing and supporting all students.

Public schools are where students come together in learning communities of all kinds that share a simple idea: All students from all backgrounds deserve a good education that inspires their curiosity and love of learning and prepares them for the many opportunities ahead.

Is Your Child Vaping or Juuling?

By Daron VanderHeiden, Superintendent

Vaping, or as some teenagers refer to it – juuling, has become a national epidemic. Vaping through an e-cigarette device has been around for about ten years. However, the use by teenagers has skyrocketed in recent years. There are an estimated 3 million high school and middle school students currently vaping in the United States. A portion of those 3 million attend the Hutchinson Middle School and the Hutchinson High School.

Doctors and other health professionals generally agree that vaping may be safer than smoking a traditional cigarette; however, the nicotine (a toxic chemical) and other harmful chemicals like the heavy metals contained in vaping are dangerous and unhealthy for teenagers. The long-term effects of vaping are unknown at this time.

The following is a list of things parents should know about vaping:

  • Vaping is the act of inhaling a vapor produced by the e-cigarette device and exhaled as a fine vapor mist, which dissipates quickly, and is mostly unrecognizable after a very short period of time. Unlike traditional cigarettes, your child could be vaping in his/her bedroom and you would not be able to detect it through smell.
  • Vaping can be just as addictive as traditional tobacco products due to the addictive characteristics of nicotine.
  • Vape cartridges comes in a variety of flavors and chemical mixtures. There are flavors like bubble gum, mango, apple pie, and watermelon. Chemical mixtures may include different levels of nicotine or marijuana. As an example, you can purchase different levels of nicotine ranging from 3 milligrams to 50 milligrams in a refill cartridge.
  • According to the Journal of the American Medical Association research, teenagers that vape are up to 5 times more likely to start smoking traditional cigarettes than those teenagers that do not vape.
  • E-cigarette devices come in a variety of models, shapes, and sizes. Some have been manufactured to look like other common electronic devices, like a flash-drive for a computer, a pen, or an ipod music device. These devices are very hard to identify if you do not examine them closely. This is one reason it is so difficult to identify and address the issue with kids.
  • E-cigarettes and vape cartridges are very easy for teenagers to purchase.
  • According to the FDA, tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of death in the United States.

Hutchinson Public Schools recognizes and treats e-cigarette possession and use as we would traditional tobacco products and act accordingly.

I liken this epidemic to teenage cigarette smoking back in the 50’s and 60’s. Teenagers at that time thought cigarette smoking was harmless. Both of my parents smoked as teenagers and adults, and I recall them talking about when they started to smoke and how unaware of the health risks they were taking. There was little to no regulation, nobody seem to care about teenagers purchasing cigarettes, they were easy to get, and there was little to no law enforcement back then trying to curb the use. Of course, both of my parents regretted ever starting to smoke. The commonalities between that era with cigarettes, and present day vaping, seem eerily similar.

Let’s work together as a community to end teenage vaping in Hutchinson for the sake of our children’s long term health. Our children will thank us later!

Activities: November 12 – 17, 2018

Click Here for this Week’s Activity Schedule

Click Here for more information about Hutch Tiger Activities

Activities Director – Thayne Johnson, CAA
Phone: 320-234-2698
Email: thayne.johnson@isd423.org

Interim Administrative Assistant – Amber Larson
Phone: 320-234-2647
Email: amber.larson@isd423.org

 

Hutchinson Public Schools

Hutchinson Public Schools