Archives for December 2017

Advocacy and Responsibility

By Keri Buker, Licensed School Counselor, Hutchinson Middle School

Teaching our kids self-advocacy and responsibility are essential and valuable life skills that extend far beyond the classroom setting. To advocate for oneself is to take the initiative to ask for what you need while being direct and specific. To be responsible is to be accountable for something. How parents help to encourage and promote self-advocacy and responsibility as children get older can become a complicated task. Teaching a few key steps to self-advocacy in the classroom environment can make their lives (and yours) easier when the stakes get higher.  As for responsibility, never underestimate the power of modeling responsibility to your children.

When issues in the classroom arise, and inevitably they do, the very first thing you should do is to encourage your child to speak with the teacher.  A child’s natural tendency is to go to their parent/guardian when issues come up and rely on them to resolve it.  As a parent, we want this kind of interaction with our children, but as much as you want to rush in and save the day, if there is an opportunity to teach your son or daughter to advocate for oneself, take it!  A positive result from this will not only make your student gain self confidence, but also empower he/she to continue to do this in the future. If your student still feels as though the issue has not been resolved, that’s when you may want to step in, but only in effort to get the facts. As much as you want to, do not assume you have heard the full story. From there, again put it back on your student to address it with the teacher, but maybe in a different way now that you have all of the facts.

Modeling responsibility from an early age could save countless headaches during the teenage years. Stress to your children the importance of routines and organization. Our most unorganized kids tend to be some of those who also struggle the most. Something as simple as giving your child the task of laying out clothes and preparing their backpack the night before school is an easy way to encourage them to take responsibility. Model this by indirectly talking them through your nightly routine. For example, if you’re checking the calendar to see what tomorrow’s events are, simply talk through your process when your child is present. It would sound something like “I’m going to check the calendar to see what we have going on tomorrow. I see you have show and tell at preschool. Let’s go pick out the item you’d like to bring and stick in it your bag so it’s ready to go for tomorrow.” Although this is subtle, it is demonstrating the process they should follow each night. Positively reinforce this when you see them doing it. A little praise will go a long way, especially for little ones.

While we never want to see our children fail, sometimes there can be valuable learning experiences from those failures. There is an old Native American proverb that says, “prepare the child for the path, not the path for the child.” A simple, yet powerful statement to keep in mind when raising children.

Tigers of the Week: Kenzie Rensch and Russell Corrigan

Congratulations to Kenzie and Russell.

Kenzie Rensch – Girls Basketball

Kenzie continues to lead the girls basketball team with scoring, defense, and rebounding. Her growth throughout the years is showing in her effort and leadership skills as well. Kenzie will have have a big impact on the success of our team.

Russell Corrigan – Boys Basketball

Russell has asserted himself as one of the leaders for the boys basketball team.  He not only leads the team in points, rebounds, blocks, and minutes played, but also is a vocal leader in the huddle and on the floor.  He accepts and appreciates all instruction to help him improve his game.  Russell’s effort is second to none and he is respectful to all players and coaches.

Activity Schedule: December 25-30, 2017

Click Here for this weeks activities schedule.

Activities Department

Thayne Johnson, Activities Director
Lori Mittelsteadt, Administrative Assistant

COMPETE LIKE A TIGER

TENACITY, INTEGRITY, GRATITUDE, EFFORT, RESPECT
TIGER PRIDE!

Tigers of the Week: Dec. 18-22, 2017 – Mandy Hay and Max Einck

Congratulations to Mandy and Max, our TIGERs of the Week for December 18 – 22.

Mandy Hay – Dance

Mandy has shown that she is a true team player over the past week of practice. With changes made to our high kick routine, she was able and willing to learn many new parts in our choreography. Her attitude and work ethic is one that all athletes should emulate.

Max Einck – Boys Swim and Dive

Max’s work ethic in practice is top notch.  He is a team player and makes sure to include the new swimmers to make them feel valued.  He swam a personal best time of 5:49 in the 500 yard freestyle at the meet against Watertown-Mayer.  Max is a role model of good sportsmanship, congratulating his opponents after each race.

Activity Schedule: December 18-23, 2017

Click Here for this weeks activities schedule.

Activities Department

Thayne Johnson, Activities Director
Lori Mittelsteadt, Administrative Assistant

COMPETE LIKE A TIGER

TENACITY, INTEGRITY, GRATITUDE, EFFORT, RESPECT
TIGER PRIDE!

Bullying

When Mean and Rude Behavior Turns to Bullying

Bill Carlson, Assistant Principal, Hutchinson Middle School

Every year when starting the second trimester at HMS we must take time to review bullying with our students and staff. Second trimester is when mean and rude behavior can turn into bullying. Bullying is described as, ‘The process of intimidating or mistreating somebody weaker or in a more vulnerable situation.’  Bullying has been around for a very long time.  The nuts and bolts of bullying have stayed the same for many years but with the advancement and availability of technology the methods of bullying have reached a whole new level of harassment.

Technology like cell phones, instant photo sharing, texting, snap chat, social networks like Facebook, internet blogs and Skype broadcasts are all being used to bully.  When people use technology to bully it is called, cyber bullying. With cyber bullying the victims frequently do not know who the perpetrator is and the use of technology frequently exposes the victims’ harassment to a much larger audience.

It is my experience that not all youth who taunt and hassle their peers understand the significance of their actions. It is an ordinary occurrence for adolescents to make honest mistakes in judgment, but if the behaviors they impose are recurring and are intended to deliberately hurt another; their actions need to be dealt with firmly and promptly.

Bullying is a serious wrongdoing. It can have long lasting negative effects and needs to be taken seriously.  Parents can and should monitor their child’s use of technology. Having, ‘house rules’ regarding the use or misuse of technology can be very effective.  This choice to be informed may be an unpopular practice but with the current climate of cyber bullying a parent needs to be informed and involved.  Anyone who has a concern about the harassment/bullying of a child needs to report it immediately.  Reporting concerns to your local school administration or to the police is completely appropriate and encouraged.

The responsibility to end bullying lies on all of our shoulders.  The first step is to look in the mirror.  How do we treat others?  What are our behaviors with our own family members? How do we behave when we are angry or frustrated? Do we judge and put down others in front of our children? Do we practice tolerance and patience?  It is important that as adults we practice what we preach.  It is never too late to improve upon ourselves.

If your child is a victim of any type of bullying it is important that you act rather than react. Document your child’s complaints, noting dates, location and times of occurrence, witnesses, etc. If your child is the victim of cyber bullying it is important that you do not erase the material or communications that were used to harass your child.  Factual evidence is of great help when bullying situations are investigated by school officials or police.

Lastly, I would like to encourage all of you who read this article to step-up, speak up and take an active role to stop bullying. As an adult we have a great opportunity each day to model positive interactions through our words, actions, and technology use.   You can make a difference!

Tigers of the Week: Dec 11-15, 2017 – Tristian Lang & Anna Fabel

Congratulations to Tristian and Anna, our TIGERs of the Week for December 11 – 15

Tristian Lang – Wrestling

Tristian went 4-0 with 3 falls last Saturday at the Park Duals.  He has brought a great attitude to practice every day and has shown a lot of improvement in his confidence and ability to work on some of his weaknesses. He always shows great tenacity and effort in his matches which has allowed him to start the season with a number of falls already.

Anna Fabel – Girls Hockey

Anna tallied points in all three games last week, helping the girls to win their first two conference games of the season.  Anna is focused and plays hard every time she touches the ice, whether in practice or in games. She is very coachable and always looking for ways to improve as a player and to help her team be successful. She shows respect to her coaches, teammates, opponents and officials at all times.

Activity Schedule: December 11-16, 2017

Click Here for this weeks activities schedule.

Activities Department

Thayne Johnson, Activities Director
Lori Mittelsteadt, Administrative Assistant

COMPETE LIKE A TIGER

TENACITY, INTEGRITY, GRATITUDE, EFFORT, RESPECT
TIGER PRIDE!

Needed – Math Corps Tutor

Experience life-changing growth as a Minnesota Math Corps tutor
New opening at Park Elementary. Serve three days a week

Be a hero to 4th-5th grade students who struggle with math by serving as a Minnesota Math Corps tutor at Park Elementary. Whether you want to explore a career in education, re-enter the workforce, or give back to your community, you can make a difference as a tutor.

Park Elementary is looking for someone to join the students 3-days per week to work with them on prescribed math fluency activities! Tutors receive extensive training and support from onsite coaches. They are paid a living allowance, given federal student loan forbearance, and are eligible for an education award of $1,230 at the end of their service. Tutors 55 or older may gift the award to a child or grandchild.

Learn how you can get involved by visiting https://minnesotamathcorps.org /. You can also help by telling a friend or family member (grandparents make great tutors, too!) about our opening at Park Elementary! The position starts in January and continues through June. Flexible on which days you would serve in this position. Six hours during each of the three days for a total of 18 hours a week. Send questions to maxi.tumusiime@servetogrow.org or call 612-871-1777.

Tigers of the Week Dec. 4-8, 2017: Cale Bordson & Ragan Vilt

Congratulations to Cale and Ragan, our TIGERs of the Week for December 4 – 8

Cale Bordson – Boys Hockey

Cale has had a great start to the season. He scored two goals in our home opener. He is a leader for us both on and off the ice.  Cale is a great competitor. He has put in a great deal of effort to become a leader and understands the importance of doing things the right way in order to make everyone around him better.
 
Ragan Vilt – Girls Basketball
 

Ragan put forth a tremendous effort with her play at Kasson-Mantorville. She showed tenacity on defense while concentrating on her role. This type of leadership and attention to detail is a team goal we strive for on a daily basis. Congratulations Ragan!

Go Tigers!

Hutchinson Public Schools

Hutchinson Public Schools